Category Archives: Ethnic Community

Aboriginal Art

Aboriginal SymbolsHello everybody, my article today will speak about the famous Aboriginal art . I wanted you to know how the meaning of the Aboriginal art can represent for the Australian culture.

Anangu art has traditionally taken the form of rock paintings, sand drawings and body painting. Anangu paintings are created for religious and ceremonial expression, teaching and storytelling. Traditional methods and designs are passed on from one generation to the next.

Symbols and meanings

The symbols and figures on the shelter walls at Uluru are similar to those found in many sites throughout Central Australia. Anangu still use these symbols in their paintings and carvings. These include geometric symbols such as concentric circles, figures representing animal tracks and the outlines of animals.

These symbols can represent different meanings, however these become clear when the artists explain the story they are depicting. The true meanings of the Uluru rock paintings rest with the artists and those they were teaching. Some senior Anangu in the Park know the meaning of the cave symbols because they either painted them themselves or recalled having them explained by the artists.

In some paintings the concentric circles symbol may mean a waterhole, or a camping place. In others, the same symbol may indicate a honey ant nest or a native fig tree. Concentric circles symbols usually represent a significant ancestral site or can be an intricate part of the story being told by the artist. Continue reading

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Japan and Australia

Japanese in Sydney
As I am one of the residents in Sydney, I see a number of Asians every single day. However, I do not see Japanese as often as Chinese or Koreans.
I decided to do a quick research on the relationship Japanese people and Australia.
It is said that Australia and Japan started the relationship in 1831, when Australian whaling ships arrived at Hokkaido. Anyway, in the Edo era, there were some Australians coming to Japan as the end of seclusion in 1853.
After the end of Edo in 1867, Japan began to introduced new laws and government institutions as well as European cultures. European clothes were introduced for public service workers such as army and police.
When the demand for European style clothes was increasing, Japan found out that Australian produced wool was the best for them, and they started trade in 1879. Besides, in 1881, the first Japanese came to Northern Australia to work in the pearl industry.
They were allies in World War 1 and enemies in World War 2, but since1957, Australia and Japan, two countries located in the Pacific Ocean, has been essential partners. You can see from the fact that the exports to Japan is the biggest and imports from Japan is the third biggest in Australia Today.
In a statistic, in 2006, the  Japan-bon population in Australia was 30778.
The number of Japanese coming to Sydney
Considering the fact that 17,804 international students from Japan in Australia in 2006, most Japanese come here to study, not to settle.
Actually, an article on Japanese people in Sydney finds that “they have no intention of living in Australia for the rest of their lives ” and they are here just to enjoy “a long trip which they know will end when they eventually resettle in their country of birth”. I think it is pretty Interesting, and I am actually one of them. I am here, to absorb the cultures and values here, and it would be great if I could utilize such knowledge in Japan, and help people from both countries interact and understand each other.
Anyhow, I am so glad to see many people studying Japanese, going to Japanese restaurants and watch Japanese movies at Japanese Film Festival.
By the way, Sydney has a sister city relationship with Nagoya City, located in the center of Japan, since 1980.
There are koalas presented from Taronga Zoo in 1984 in Higashiyama Zoo, one of the most biggest zoos in Japan,  and they are one of the most popular animals in Higashiyama Zoo (like, Higashiyama Zoo remind many Japanese people of Koala). Interestingly, one of the three mascot characters of Chunichi Dragons, the professional baseball team in Nagoya, is Koala named “Doara”.
In addition, 16 students from Nagoya come to Sydney and stay for two weeks at Australian families every winter, and another 16 students from Sydney stay in Japan in October.
You can find Japanese traditional stone monument in the botanical garden near Sydney Opera House, and Nagoya garden in Hyde Park as well.
The reason why I have written so much about Nagoya is that I came from Nagoya. I visited Sydney for the first time in this program. Obviously, it had a big influence on me and now I study here in Sydney!
These are the sources that I used in this article:
Stone Monument from Nagoya City

Stone Monument from Nagoya City

As I am one of the residents in Sydney, I see a number of Asians every single day. However, I do not see Japanese as often as Chinese or Koreans. I decided to do a quick research on the relationship Japanese people and Australia.

It is said that Australia and Japan started the relationship in 1831, when Australian whaling ships arrived at Hokkaido. Anyway, in the Edo era, there were some Australians coming to Japan as the end of seclusion in 1853.

Continue reading

Little Haveli, Taste of India in Sydney.

Little Haveli

Little Haveli

We went to an indian restaurant in Broadway the other day, called “Little Haveli”. We had a birthday dinner there.

Main curry such as butter chicken curry around $14, which you have to order a rice or nan for $2.
Or you can choose a plate with several kinds of curry with salad and nan which is around $10.
After meal Lassi is available for $ 2.50 as well. I had never drunk Lassi, but it does not taste like any other juice… it was like a Yogurt drink that I had in Japan, but it was not the same. Anyway I certainly loved it.
Indian culture often can be seen anywhere in Sydney.
There were not many Indians settled in New South Wales in the early 19th Century because most of them were workers. Besides, there were a number of convicts from India as well.
Major emigration beacon from around 1853, supported and organized by Sir William Burton, a judge in NSW. The number beacon to increase from then.
Especially, the number of Indian students in Australia increased from 30000 in 2004 to 97000 in 2009. Also, Indians are the 6th biggest overseas born population in Sydney.
Curry

Curry

We went to an indian restaurant in Broadway the other day, called “Little Haveli”. We had a birthday dinner there.

The restaurant is not so big and retains home like atmosphere, but during dinner time there are lots of customers including not only Indians but also people from other nationalities.

Continue reading

Russian Immigration to Australia

Hello, I’m Russian member from the group Diverse Sydney and I’d like to present the theme about Russian Immigration to Australia.

Red Square, Moscow

Red Square, Moscow

Russian Immigration started at 19th century with the Russian expeditions, the purposes of which were to explore unknown regions of the Pacific Ocean and Antarctic. The Jackson’s port (nowadays Kirribilli) at Sydney was the main area of Russian ships, where seafarers repaired their ships and had a rest. Therewith, most of the Australian citizens, of that time, named this place as “Russian Promontory”. Continue reading

Australian Lifestyle (part 1)

Hello everyone that is the ‘Frenchy’ speaking for you to tell you the typical Australian lifestyle…

Most of the Australian people living in Australia are from England, that is the reason why Australian lifestyle is soo closed to the English lifestyle. In around the world Australia is famous for his surf lifestyle, BBQ, beer with some friends in a pub watching a rugby match after a day of surf or just having a BBQ with some friends near a beach.  Australians are very friendly and helpful people, with a great sense of humor and a natural ability to tell jokes and play with words. Some times we may appear cold because of our “private nature” which has been imported over the past 2 decades, but it is just takes time to “break the ice”, and everything goes well. It means you can talk about any subject, but for more personal matters, things will take a little bit longer to come out in the open.  Continue reading

Little Italy – Leichhardt

The Italian Forum

The Italian Forum

After busy weeks with assignments, Nikita and I decided to have a saturday lunch in Leichhardt, a inner-west suburban area of Sydney. Leichhardt is often claimed to be the “Little Italy” in Sydney because of the Italian community and the culture associated with Italian emigrants.

Leichhardt is named after the persian (German) explorer, Ludwig Leichhardt, who came to Australia in 1842 for his study of rocks and nature. Italian migration began in 1920s, and its population sprang after the Second World War. It has influenced the area with Italian culture such as cafes and Italian restaurants. In fact, the Italian population there is decreasing at the moment. However, it still retains a strong Italian influence in every corner of the area.

Continue reading

The French in Australia

1797 laPerouse mapHello everyone, that the “Frenchy” speaking for you about the French community in Australia…

To begin, a short history of French in Australia… back to January 1788 with the arrival of La Perouse expedition in Botanic Bay. La Perouse left the French port of Brest in August 1785 and headed south. In the next 2 and a half years, La Boussole and L’Astrolabe would sail many thousands of kilometres and cross the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans several times. Then since this expédition French people have been living in Australia.

The Consulate General of France estimates that the French community of Australia comprised 70 000 people in 2006. Of these, 55 000 (mostly dual nationals) were not registered at the Consulate General. In addition, more than 6 000 young French people are currently visiting Australia as part of the Working Holiday Visa program. Continue reading