Author Archives: areyouawake9

Photos from In-Fusion Festival

I realized that I still have a lot of photos from In-Fusion festival!

I hope it can deliver the feeling of the festival to you.

Audience

Audience

IMG_2257

Arabic Dancer

Stage

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Japan and Australia

Japanese in Sydney
As I am one of the residents in Sydney, I see a number of Asians every single day. However, I do not see Japanese as often as Chinese or Koreans.
I decided to do a quick research on the relationship Japanese people and Australia.
It is said that Australia and Japan started the relationship in 1831, when Australian whaling ships arrived at Hokkaido. Anyway, in the Edo era, there were some Australians coming to Japan as the end of seclusion in 1853.
After the end of Edo in 1867, Japan began to introduced new laws and government institutions as well as European cultures. European clothes were introduced for public service workers such as army and police.
When the demand for European style clothes was increasing, Japan found out that Australian produced wool was the best for them, and they started trade in 1879. Besides, in 1881, the first Japanese came to Northern Australia to work in the pearl industry.
They were allies in World War 1 and enemies in World War 2, but since1957, Australia and Japan, two countries located in the Pacific Ocean, has been essential partners. You can see from the fact that the exports to Japan is the biggest and imports from Japan is the third biggest in Australia Today.
In a statistic, in 2006, the  Japan-bon population in Australia was 30778.
The number of Japanese coming to Sydney
Considering the fact that 17,804 international students from Japan in Australia in 2006, most Japanese come here to study, not to settle.
Actually, an article on Japanese people in Sydney finds that “they have no intention of living in Australia for the rest of their lives ” and they are here just to enjoy “a long trip which they know will end when they eventually resettle in their country of birth”. I think it is pretty Interesting, and I am actually one of them. I am here, to absorb the cultures and values here, and it would be great if I could utilize such knowledge in Japan, and help people from both countries interact and understand each other.
Anyhow, I am so glad to see many people studying Japanese, going to Japanese restaurants and watch Japanese movies at Japanese Film Festival.
By the way, Sydney has a sister city relationship with Nagoya City, located in the center of Japan, since 1980.
There are koalas presented from Taronga Zoo in 1984 in Higashiyama Zoo, one of the most biggest zoos in Japan,  and they are one of the most popular animals in Higashiyama Zoo (like, Higashiyama Zoo remind many Japanese people of Koala). Interestingly, one of the three mascot characters of Chunichi Dragons, the professional baseball team in Nagoya, is Koala named “Doara”.
In addition, 16 students from Nagoya come to Sydney and stay for two weeks at Australian families every winter, and another 16 students from Sydney stay in Japan in October.
You can find Japanese traditional stone monument in the botanical garden near Sydney Opera House, and Nagoya garden in Hyde Park as well.
The reason why I have written so much about Nagoya is that I came from Nagoya. I visited Sydney for the first time in this program. Obviously, it had a big influence on me and now I study here in Sydney!
These are the sources that I used in this article:
Stone Monument from Nagoya City

Stone Monument from Nagoya City

As I am one of the residents in Sydney, I see a number of Asians every single day. However, I do not see Japanese as often as Chinese or Koreans. I decided to do a quick research on the relationship Japanese people and Australia.

It is said that Australia and Japan started the relationship in 1831, when Australian whaling ships arrived at Hokkaido. Anyway, in the Edo era, there were some Australians coming to Japan as the end of seclusion in 1853.

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Little Haveli, Taste of India in Sydney.

Little Haveli

Little Haveli

We went to an indian restaurant in Broadway the other day, called “Little Haveli”. We had a birthday dinner there.

Main curry such as butter chicken curry around $14, which you have to order a rice or nan for $2.
Or you can choose a plate with several kinds of curry with salad and nan which is around $10.
After meal Lassi is available for $ 2.50 as well. I had never drunk Lassi, but it does not taste like any other juice… it was like a Yogurt drink that I had in Japan, but it was not the same. Anyway I certainly loved it.
Indian culture often can be seen anywhere in Sydney.
There were not many Indians settled in New South Wales in the early 19th Century because most of them were workers. Besides, there were a number of convicts from India as well.
Major emigration beacon from around 1853, supported and organized by Sir William Burton, a judge in NSW. The number beacon to increase from then.
Especially, the number of Indian students in Australia increased from 30000 in 2004 to 97000 in 2009. Also, Indians are the 6th biggest overseas born population in Sydney.
Curry

Curry

We went to an indian restaurant in Broadway the other day, called “Little Haveli”. We had a birthday dinner there.

The restaurant is not so big and retains home like atmosphere, but during dinner time there are lots of customers including not only Indians but also people from other nationalities.

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Little Italy – Leichhardt

The Italian Forum

The Italian Forum

After busy weeks with assignments, Nikita and I decided to have a saturday lunch in Leichhardt, a inner-west suburban area of Sydney. Leichhardt is often claimed to be the “Little Italy” in Sydney because of the Italian community and the culture associated with Italian emigrants.

Leichhardt is named after the persian (German) explorer, Ludwig Leichhardt, who came to Australia in 1842 for his study of rocks and nature. Italian migration began in 1920s, and its population sprang after the Second World War. It has influenced the area with Italian culture such as cafes and Italian restaurants. In fact, the Italian population there is decreasing at the moment. However, it still retains a strong Italian influence in every corner of the area.

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Mix, Mix, Mix, – Pepper Lunch

Pepper Lunch!

Pepper Lunch!

I went to Pepper Lunch with my friends today, which is a steak restaurant in George Street.

I had actually knew Pepper Lunch, as it is a restaurant franchise in Japan. It is not like a usual steak restaurant as it is a sort of “fast-food” style one. It is cheap and fast. It is famous for “pepper lunch” plates which you are served with a piece of raw beef and rice in a hot plate. You mix them up, and then it is ready.

Pepper lunch was began by Kunio Ichinose 14 years ago. He was a chef and had his own restaurant in Tokyo, and he was one of the earliest who introduced induction cookers to cook steaks. Around that time, major steak restaurants came to have cheap dishes because of a liberalization of beef trade and strong Japanese yen. However, he had a strong belief that there had to be some new style of serving steaks if they wanted to serve them cheap. He then came up with the method of pepper lunch plate using metal plates and the induction cookers, and opened the first Pepper Lunch in Kanagawa, Japan. Continue reading

Full House, the Korean Restaurant

Bulgogi

Bulgogi

As I have lived in Sydney for months, I must say that the diversity of ethnic cuisines is one of the greatest things here. Chinese, Thai, Korean, Malaysian, French, Russian, Indian, Japanese… pretty much everything is within a walking distance from each other.

For a lunch on a sunny day, we decided to spend 10 dollars each at a Korean restaurant in the City. It is called Full House.

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Chinese Migration in Australia

China Town in Sydney

China Town in Sydney (Photo by JAQ'S PhotoStorage)

When I first started going to a university in Sydney, I was surprised by the number of Asian people I saw. There were tons of them, and they were especially Chinese. I knew that I was one of the Asians, but I had never seen so many Asians at one time.

Anyway, that was when I started wondering why there are so many Chinese in Australia, and I believe it is important and interesting to know the history when in Australia. I did a quick research from the book called “Chinese Migration and Settlement In Australia” by C.Y. Choi.

Australia, as well as other new Anglo-Saxon countries like California, British Columbia and New Zealand, was in great demand, because of frontier development.

Firstly, this demand was met by the convicts sent to Australia (and the black slaves to the U.S.). However, because the British Empire abolished slavery in 1833, these countries came to have Chinese workers instead to meet the demand. In addition, in 1860, the Peking Convention made it legal to recruit Chinese workers in treaty ports.
The first Chinese workers, made up of 100 adults and 20 boys, came from Amoy (Xiamen) to New South Wales through the agency of J. Tait  in 1848. From then on, there were some influx of Chinese people, but the author says that there was probably less than 3000 by the Gold Rush period.
Then, because of the Gold discoveries in New South Wales and Victoria in 1851, the situation of Chinese emigrants underwent a large increase in terms of numbers.
Nevertheless, the Australians at that time, including the convicts, feared the intense increase of Chinese, and laws that restrict the number of immigrants were legislated in Victoria, South Australia and New South Wales from 1855 to 1861. In addition, A similar but more strict law to exclude Chinese and other races was enacted, which was the Commonwealth Immigration Restriction Act 1901-1956, which required all the immigrants to take dictation tests.
Therefore, even though It is believed to have been 45,000 to 50,000 Chinese at its peak, there occurred a number of departures back to China, and the census in 1901 recorded only 29,627 Chinese in Australia. The Chinese population had continued the decline, and it was the lowest in 1947 with the number of less than 10,000 including only 5,400 of foreign born Chinese.
After the establishment of the People’s Republic in China in 1949, many Chinese feared of being taken away land ownership or being considered to be ‘bourgeois’, and that was one of the triggers of Chinese people to decide settle permanently abroad.
Therefore, the departures back to China stopped, and a continuous increase of Chinese population begun in the post war period since 1947,

In the first half of the 19th century, Australia, as well as other new Anglo-Saxon countries like California, British Columbia and New Zealand, was in great demand, because of frontier development.

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